Month: November 2018

Old Man Luedecke on tour in Australia

Canadian singer-songwriter Old Man Luedecke is a fairly regular presence in Australia, thanks to his dedication to touring here. And Australian audiences appreciate his charm and gentle sense of humour – and, of course, his music. For an example of all of that, see this video of ‘Low on the Hog’ from his latest album, One Night Only! Live at the Chester Playhouse.

 

Old Man Luedecke tour dates – go to https://festivalofsmallhalls.com/tours/summer-2018/ for details

Thu Nov 29
Brookstead Hall, Brookstead QLD*

Fri Nov 30
Maryvale Community Hall, Maryvale QLD*

Sat Dec 1
Cooranga North Memorial Hall, Cooranga Nth QLD*

Sun Dec 2
Mothar Mountain Hall, Mothar Mountain QLD*

Wed Dec 5
Koah Hall, Koah QLD*

Thu Dec 6
Forrest Beach Senior Citizens Centre, Forrest Beach QLD*

Fri Dec 7
Middlemount Community Hall, Middlemount QLD*

Sat Dec 8
Queen Street Hall, Yeppoon QLD*

Sun Dec 9
Bucca Hall, Bucca QLD*

Wed Dec 12
Rainbow Beach Community Hall, Rainbow Beach QLD*

Thu Dec 13
Thornville Hall, Thornville QLD*

Fri Dec 14
Springbrook Community Hall, Springbrook QLD*

Sat Dec 15
Mt Nebo Community Hall, Mt Nebo QLD*

Sun Dec 16
Eudlo Hall, Eudlo QLD*

Dec 27 – Jan 01
Woodford Folk Festival
woodfordfolkfestival.com

*With Lucy Wise

oldmanluedecke.ca

Album review: All the While by Little Georgia

unnamed (5)Little Georgia is an Australian duo comprised of Justin Carter and Ashleigh Mannix, and their sound comprises elements of folk, rock and some country. In searching for the right adjectives to describe their new album, All the While, the one that keeps coming up is ‘addictive’. ‘Hypnotic’ is also applicable, and not because the sound loops around but because there’s a beat and drive behind it that is both compelling and soothing.

Great music always requires a degree of alchemy – with eight notes in an octave, there has to be something indefinable that makes one song, one sound, different to another. In the case of Little Georgia, the alchemy is in the combination of Mannix and Carter. While singing alone they are perfectly find and dandy – more than that, even – but together there is magic. They’ve spent three years on the road, playing together around the world, so it’s likely not magic but solid work that has resulted in the ten wonderful songs on this album. It’s too easily, actually, to say that artists are ‘talented’ and ascribe their achievements to that – every time there is a production of high quality, it’s talent that’s brought them to a certain point but it’s always the work that takes them most of the way.

All the While also benefits from the familiarity that is clearly between the two members of the band. Mannix and Carter know each other’s musical nooks and crannies well, which means they can push and pull the other into interesting and curious musical places. It makes for nicely complex songs with rich texture, plenty of emotion and lots of great detail. That’s what makes them addictive: with each listening there’s always the sense that there’s more to find, so you’ll return, and find more, and know there’s still more. What a lovely gift to offer listeners, and what a great foundation for, ideally, more recorded music to come.

All the While is out now.

Apple Music | iTunes | Spotify

littlegeorgiamusic.com

Interview: Brooke Lambert

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Queensland-based singer-songwriter Brooke Lambert has recently released the single ‘I Don’t Wanna Hate You’, after an EP last year and ahead of a new release in 2019. As I found when I spoke to her, she is passionate about country music, constantly creative and diversely talented. Brooke will appearing at the 2019 Tamworth Country Music Festival – dates below, after the interview.

You live on the Gold Coast and I’ve noticed that a few country music artists are moving there – there are a few on the Central Coast of New South Wales as well, but you come from the Central Coast originally and you’ve moved to Queensland.

I was born in Gosford but my mum and dad were driving up, literally moving from Sydney to the Gold Coast, so I didn’t have a choice. She pretty much popped me out on the way up. But in terms of everyone else, I know with Queensland and the Gold Coast, especially with the Groundwater Festival being so successful, country music is getting really big in Queensland now, which is why I think everyone’s heading up here. And, let’s face it, it’s a great place to live!

Are you finding that more venues are opening? Or are the venues that are there friendly to country music?

More in Brisbane, I’d say, than the Gold Coast. Everywhere I play people are pretty open, but I think in terms of a Saturday night out, people on the Gold Coast don’t really want to hear country music [laughs].

Groundwater seems to get bigger and bigger every year.

I think there are a lot of country music fans on the Gold Coast and there’s nowhere for them to go and see it, so when that festival’s here, because it’s a once-a-year thing, everyone really comes together.

I’ll now backtrack to when you were growing up – what did you grow up listening to and what had the most impact on you?

We got the Country Music Channel on Foxtel when I was a kid, and I always wanted to be on that channel. I don’t know what it was but country music, I just love it. I remember ‘I Hope You Dance’ by Leann Womack – I used to watch that video over and over again, so that was a huge influence. I listened to a lot of Keith Urban and Adam Brand, the Dixie Chicks and Shania Twain – I just love it.

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Interview: Fanny Lumsden

Fanny Lumsden_RMDC Promo-2[1].jpgOver the past few years there has emerged a singular artist in Australian country music, and her name is Fanny Lumsden. Fanny is a singer-songwriter from New South Wales but she’s also a connector of communities across our wide brown land, a conjurer of audiences in small outback towns and a multi-armed goddess holding her guitar in one hand, a record label in another, a microphone, a baby, award nominations, a production company and a multitude of other things. That is not to say that other artists aren’t doing this – Catherine Britt springs immediately to mind – but there’s only one Fanny Lumsden. As an observer and a fan, it is always fascinating to watch her work. And, as Fanny makes it clear in this interview, it’s not just her behind it all – but that doesn’t make her any less inspiring or interesting. That’s quite apart from the fact that she writes some of the best songs you’ll ever hear, available on her two albums Small Town Big Shot and Real Class Act. We spoke on the occasion of the release of her latest single, ‘Real Men Don’t Cry (War on Pride)’, and the extraordinary video that accompanies it, which you can watch below.

You are such an intrepid artist, you seemed to be on a plane to the US within a fortnight of having a baby – so how was your first tour with a plus one?

Well, it was way more complicated than I’d originally anticipated. I was a bit naïve, I think, and I’d booked all this stuff in before I had him, and then I thought, This is so hard![laughs]

I remember seeing you getting on a plane to Adelaide to play a show when he was very, very little.

He was three weeks at that point. It’s all been quite a steep learning curve – I take my hat off to all the parents out there because it’s way harder than I thought. But when you don’t have a choice you just do what you have to do.

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On tour: Ben Mastwyk, Rose Zita Falko & Mitch Power

45569159_863973777059728_3362841598994939904_oAustralians on the east coast are lucky – because the Roadshow Deluxe Tour is heading their way. The combination of Ben Mastwyk, Rose Zita Falko and Mitch Power is playing in Queensland and Victoria in November and December.

Melburnian Mastwyk has been building his fan base with songs such as ‘This Country’. Zalko also hails from the south and brings with her the successful debut EP Original Son and its iTunes top 20 single ‘A Town Called Lonely’. Completing the troika is singer-songwriter Mitch Power, who has toured extensively over the past few years and has also found success as a stand-up comedian.

That’s three guaranteed great artists on the one bill, making for a show not to be missed.

Dates:

Sat 10th NOV | The Bearded Lady (3pm) | Brisbane, QLD
Sun 11th NOV | Can You Keep A Secret (6pm) | Brisbane, QLD
Fri 23rd NOV | The Skylark Room | Upwey, VIC
Sat 24th NOV | Major Tom’s | Kyneton, VIC
Thurs 13th DEC | Spotted Mallard | Brunswick, VIC
Sun 16th DEC | The Bridge Hotel | Castlemaine, VIC

benmastwyk.com

rosezitafalko.com

mitchpowermusic.bandcamp.com

Interview: Jenny Mitchell

JENNYMITCHELL-6.JPGOne of the most impressive emerging country music artists in the Southern Hemisphere is New Zealand singer-songwriter Jenny Mitchell. She recently released a new album, Wildfires, and before that the title single. She’ll be appearing at the Tamworth Country Music Festival and is currently on tour in Australia; if you need a reason to see her perform, simply watch the video below. I spoke to Jenny recently and found a clear-eyed artist and performer who is passionate about music and working hard to bring it to audiences on both sides of the Tasman.

You’re nineteen years old and you’re already about to release your second album, incredibly. When did your musical life start?

My dad is like a real traditional Hank Williams, Johnny Cash man. So when I was growing up my life soundtrack was the Dixie Chicks and stuff like that. My first on-stage performance with Dad was when I was four. So it has always been something that we’ve been involved in. In 2013 I did New Zealand’s Got Talent, so that kind of started a whole new sort of chapter … I think it’s a really hard transition from being sixteen and having it as a hobby to fulfilling it and saying, ‘Actually, I am going to try to do this.’ So it’s been an interesting time.

At four years of age you were probably too young to be nervous, but at thirteen, what was that like going on a national TV show?

I think it was really good. I think probably if it was a few years later, I would have been really stressed about the big picture and worried about all that stuff, but at the time I remember some of my biggest concerns was things like the different outfits that I didn’t like, and my friends at school will think I’m such a loser and stuff like that. So, I think it was almost good that it was so young, because it one, prepared me for those nerves, [which] were quite horrific. You don’t know what the judges are going to say, so I think it was quite good because it kind of put me through the boot camp of learning how to deal with stress and now I’m like, okay, nothing is as bad as that.

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